How to find an email for just about anyone

Everyone loves to hide their emails on their website. They use contact forms to avoid spammers picking up their email, so how exactly do you find someone’s email address? These are some tools that I use.

Website

First stop, their website. Some businesses freely post their email, although it may not be the best one to contact them on. Check the contact page or the footer to see if there’s an email address.

Tools

No luck with the website? Check out these tools to help you discover emails out in the open.

Clearbit Chrome Extension

Clearbit Chrome Extension
The free version lets you find 40 emails per month, the paid let’s you find 100. Once installed, head to Gmail and compose a new email. The tool will pop up and you search by company name or domain.

Norbert
Find email addresses and verify them. You get 50 free searches per month.

Hunter.io
This website let’s you search for emails by domain name. Just type the domain and you’ll see blurred out emails. Don’t worry! Just click the sources links to the right and you can find the emails on certain pages.

Facebook

Not many articles I’ve read mention looking on Facebook pages. For some reason, companies won’t put their email on their website, but 75% will put it on their Facebook page. Check the about section of a company’s Facebook page and see.

WHOIS

Lastly, I recommend checkout out WHOIS.ICANN.org, this site let’s you see who registered a domain name and it usually includes an email. This works as long as the company doesn’t use a proxy to shield their information. When using this site, make sure to enter the email without any symbols so http://buffer.com needs to be buffer.com.

10 ideas for Buffer

I’ve admired Buffer ever since I heard about their company’s values. I’ve even applied there, though I didn’t make the cut.

Still, that hasn’t deterred me from still following and using their product.

Here are 10 ideas for Buffer

  1. Start a vlog about what it’s like to work at Buffer, what you do all day
  2. Create a remote work conference
  3. Sell a buffer mug (everyone loves coffee)
  4. Write a book about Buffer
  5. Podcast on remote work
  6. Crowdsource a blog post (let the community create and write it)
  7. Support a cause/charity
  8. Crowdsource a new product idea/feature
  9. Contest to join buffer retreat
  10. Don’t use slack for 1 day

10 ideas a day

I haven’t written on here in a while (my bad). I’m working on a new project and it’s consuming all my time outside of work.

Now, let me stop trying to make excuses and get to the point of this post.

I’m going to try something new. I was reading Tools of Titans by Tim Ferriss and saw something from James Altucher about coming up with 10 ideas per day.

I want to do this and come up with 10 ideas for businesses I like.

I won’t be doing this every single day, but I want to try to get a list done and sent to the company at least 3 times per week. That’s just 30 ideas!

The point is for this to be a creative exercise and to share the ideas. An idea is nothing until it’s acted upon. I’ll be happy if they use my ideas, not mad that they “stole my idea”.

If you want more, here’s James’s article on how to become an idea machine.